1864

In July 1864, Thomas Messenger received a first-class certificate in Class 86[1] for his hot-water stop-valve at the Royal Horticultural Society Implement Show, held from 20th July until 24th August, in the arcades at the RHS Gardens, London[2].

Advertisement – The Gardeners’ Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, 6 February 1864

The Midland Steam Horticultural and Hot-Water Works

Immediately following the end of the show he was advertising[3] that due to “the great demand for his Horticultural Buildings and Heating Apparatus”, he had just completed a major investment programme at his High Street works. This included significant additions to the works, installing an entirely new range of steam-powered machinery. Yet again, he was offering to provide products at the “lowest possible price” consistent with “good and substantial work”.

Following the completion of the investment programme he immediately renamed the works to ‘The Midland Steam Horticultural and Hot-Water Works’, a name that only persisted a few years before being renamed to ‘The Midlands Steam Power Horticultural Works’ in 1866, although by mid-way through 1870 it was changed again, this time to ‘The Midland Horticultural and Hot-Water Engineering Works’[4].

He was still combining several roles, often joining them to provide a multi-disciplined solution. One such example was the then new Unitarian Chapel, Victoria Street, Loughborough, which was opened on 14th December 1864, where Thomas Messenger was responsible for both the glazing and heating system (see Chapter 4 for more details). Interestingly he was not responsible for installing the gas fittings, which was undertaken by Mr. Rhodes, of Nottingham[5].

Advertisement – The Gardeners’ Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, 27 August 1864

 

References:

  1. The Proceedings of the Royal Horticultural Society, Volume IV, January 1st – December 31st 1864, page 156.

  2. The Proceedings of the Royal Horticultural Society, Volume IV, January 1st – December 31st 1864, page 156.

  3. The Gardeners’ Chronicle & Agricultural Gazette, 27th August 1864.

  4. The Gardeners’ Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, 17th September 1870.

  5. The Leicester Chronicle and the Leicestershire Mercury, 17th December 1864.